Ruxton Sedan Color Schemes Eccentric In Any Era

August 07, 2023  •  Leave a Comment

1930 Ruxton sedan photographed by Glenn Franco Simmons.1930 Ruxton SedanThe colors around the wheel change, depending upon available light, flash, and/or camera/lens used. With a bright multicolored design, the 1930 Ruxton five passenger sedan at Blackhawk Automotive Museum in Danville, Calif., would be an eccentric automobile in any era, including the present one. I photographed this car almost 13 years ago, so it may no longer be at the museum.

Under contract to New Era Motors, the five-passenger sedan that sports colorful hub caps was built by the Moon Motor Car Co. of St. Louis, Mo., and the Kissel Motor Car Co. of Hartford, Wis. ~ each company part of America’s early and legendary automotive age.

1930 Ruxton photographed by Glenn Franco Simmons.1930 Ruxton Sedan(Editor's note: The camera's flash distorted the colors just a big, but there is not much that can be done with the camera I was using at the time.)

With a bright multicolored design, the 1930 Ruxton five passenger sedan at Blackhawk Automotive Museum in Danville, Calif., would be an eccentric automobile in any era, including the present one.

I photographed this car almost 13 years ago, so it may no longer be at the museum.

Under contract to New Era Motors, the five-passenger sedan that sports colorful hub caps was built by the Moon Motor Car Co. of St. Louis, Mo., and the Kissel Motor Car Co. of Hartford, Wis. ~ each company part of America’s early and legendary automotive age.

“Josef Urban, a New York City theater set designer, created the body color scheme: eight colors were applied in overlapping horizontal bands that served to exaggerate the already low profile of the car,” states Blackhawk. “A second multicolor combination was available with shades of brown, tan, orange and white; most Ruxtons were just painted black.”

Ruxton offered a variety of colors because it desired to stand out in the competitive automotive market. During The Great Depression, car sales declined and manufacturers looked for ways to stimulate interest in their products. Ruxton believed that offering a wide palette of colors would attract customers who sought innovation and individuality.

Each Ruxton car was meticulously hand-painted, providing an artisanal touch that enhanced the overall aesthetic appeal of the vehicle. Buyers had the opportunity to choose from unconventional hues such as vibrant blues, rich reds, deep purples and even metallic finishes. These vibrant colors not only made a statement but also provided a sense of joy and elegance amidst the economic hardships of the era.

The introduction of the Ruxton and its striking colors was met with both admiration and skepticism. Some praised the car’s boldness and the sense of luxury it exuded, while others found the bright colors too unconventional for their taste.

Nevertheless, the Ruxton became a symbol of elegance and prestige, catering to those who desired a unique and vibrant driving experience.

Unfortunately, despite its initial success, the Ruxton Motor Co. faced financial difficulties due to the challenging economic climate and limited production capacity.

By 1931, the company ceased production, leaving behind a legacy of innovation coupled with a rich color palette that set the Ruxton apart from its contemporaries and from future generations of cars.

“The front-wheel drive eliminated the central driveshaft, providing a much-lower car than other cars of the period," according to Blackhawk. “The streamlined Woodlite headlamps were an accessory item and part of the overall design.”

Blackhawk said only 298 Ruxtons were built, and fewer than 20 are known to exist today.

Many of this era's cars were at least six feet from ground to roof top; the Ruxton was 53 inches, as opposed to 60).

Blackhawk has an admission fee or you can join and become a member.

ENGINE
8 cylinder, Continental L-head
3” bore, 4.75” stroke
268.6 cubic inch
100 hp. @ 3400 rpm

PRICE WHEN NEW
$3,915 (1930 dollar valuation)

BODY/COACHBUILDER
Budd Manufacturing Co.
Philadelphia, Penn.
MANUFACTURER
New Era Motors Inc.
New York, N.Y.
“Josef Urban, a New York City theater set designer, created the body color scheme: eight colors were applied in overlapping horizontal bands that served to exaggerate the already low profile of the car,” states Blackhawk. “A second multicolor combination was available with shades of brown, tan, orange and white; most Ruxtons were just painted black.”

Ruxton offered a variety of colors because it desired to stand out in the competitive automotive market. During The Great Depression, car sales declined and manufacturers looked for ways to stimulate interest in their products. Ruxton believed that offering a wide palette of colors would attract customers who sought innovation and individuality.

Each Ruxton car was meticulously hand-painted, providing an artisanal touch that enhanced the overall aesthetic appeal of the vehicle. Buyers had the opportunity to choose from unconventional hues such as vibrant blues, rich reds, deep purples and even metallic finishes. These vibrant colors not only made a statement but also provided a sense of joy and elegance amidst the economic hardships of the era.

1930 Ruxton photographed by Glenn Franco Simmons.1930 Ruxton Sedan(Editor's note: The camera's flash distorted the colors just a big, but there is not much that can be done with the camera I was using at the time.)

With a bright multicolored design, the 1930 Ruxton five passenger sedan at Blackhawk Automotive Museum in Danville, Calif., would be an eccentric automobile in any era, including the present one.

I photographed this car almost 13 years ago, so it may no longer be at the museum.

Under contract to New Era Motors, the five-passenger sedan that sports colorful hub caps was built by the Moon Motor Car Co. of St. Louis, Mo., and the Kissel Motor Car Co. of Hartford, Wis. ~ each company part of America’s early and legendary automotive age.

“Josef Urban, a New York City theater set designer, created the body color scheme: eight colors were applied in overlapping horizontal bands that served to exaggerate the already low profile of the car,” states Blackhawk. “A second multicolor combination was available with shades of brown, tan, orange and white; most Ruxtons were just painted black.”

Ruxton offered a variety of colors because it desired to stand out in the competitive automotive market. During The Great Depression, car sales declined and manufacturers looked for ways to stimulate interest in their products. Ruxton believed that offering a wide palette of colors would attract customers who sought innovation and individuality.

Each Ruxton car was meticulously hand-painted, providing an artisanal touch that enhanced the overall aesthetic appeal of the vehicle. Buyers had the opportunity to choose from unconventional hues such as vibrant blues, rich reds, deep purples and even metallic finishes. These vibrant colors not only made a statement but also provided a sense of joy and elegance amidst the economic hardships of the era.

The introduction of the Ruxton and its striking colors was met with both admiration and skepticism. Some praised the car’s boldness and the sense of luxury it exuded, while others found the bright colors too unconventional for their taste.

Nevertheless, the Ruxton became a symbol of elegance and prestige, catering to those who desired a unique and vibrant driving experience.

Unfortunately, despite its initial success, the Ruxton Motor Co. faced financial difficulties due to the challenging economic climate and limited production capacity.

By 1931, the company ceased production, leaving behind a legacy of innovation coupled with a rich color palette that set the Ruxton apart from its contemporaries and from future generations of cars.

“The front-wheel drive eliminated the central driveshaft, providing a much-lower car than other cars of the period," according to Blackhawk. “The streamlined Woodlite headlamps were an accessory item and part of the overall design.”

Blackhawk said only 298 Ruxtons were built, and fewer than 20 are known to exist today.

Many of this era's cars were at least six feet from ground to roof top; the Ruxton was 53 inches, as opposed to 60).

Blackhawk has an admission fee or you can join and become a member.

ENGINE
8 cylinder, Continental L-head
3” bore, 4.75” stroke
268.6 cubic inch
100 hp. @ 3400 rpm

PRICE WHEN NEW
$3,915 (1930 dollar valuation)

BODY/COACHBUILDER
Budd Manufacturing Co.
Philadelphia, Penn.
MANUFACTURER
New Era Motors Inc.
New York, N.Y.

The introduction of the Ruxton and its striking colors was met with both admiration and skepticism. Some praised the car’s boldness and the sense of luxury it exuded, while others found the bright colors too unconventional for their taste.

Nevertheless, the Ruxton became a symbol of elegance and prestige, catering to those who desired a unique and vibrant driving experience.

Unfortunately, despite its initial success, the Ruxton Motor Co. faced financial difficulties due to the challenging economic climate and limited production capacity.

By 1931, the company ceased production, leaving behind a legacy of innovation coupled with a rich color palette that set the Ruxton apart from its contemporaries and from future generations of cars.
1930 Ruxton photographed by Glenn Franco Simmons.1930 Ruxton Sedan(Editor's note: The camera's flash distorted the colors just a big, but there is not much that can be done with the camera I was using at the time.)

With a bright multicolored design, the 1930 Ruxton five passenger sedan at Blackhawk Automotive Museum in Danville, Calif., would be an eccentric automobile in any era, including the present one.

I photographed this car almost 13 years ago, so it may no longer be at the museum.

Under contract to New Era Motors, the five-passenger sedan that sports colorful hub caps was built by the Moon Motor Car Co. of St. Louis, Mo., and the Kissel Motor Car Co. of Hartford, Wis. ~ each company part of America’s early and legendary automotive age.

“Josef Urban, a New York City theater set designer, created the body color scheme: eight colors were applied in overlapping horizontal bands that served to exaggerate the already low profile of the car,” states Blackhawk. “A second multicolor combination was available with shades of brown, tan, orange and white; most Ruxtons were just painted black.”

Ruxton offered a variety of colors because it desired to stand out in the competitive automotive market. During The Great Depression, car sales declined and manufacturers looked for ways to stimulate interest in their products. Ruxton believed that offering a wide palette of colors would attract customers who sought innovation and individuality.

Each Ruxton car was meticulously hand-painted, providing an artisanal touch that enhanced the overall aesthetic appeal of the vehicle. Buyers had the opportunity to choose from unconventional hues such as vibrant blues, rich reds, deep purples and even metallic finishes. These vibrant colors not only made a statement but also provided a sense of joy and elegance amidst the economic hardships of the era.

The introduction of the Ruxton and its striking colors was met with both admiration and skepticism. Some praised the car’s boldness and the sense of luxury it exuded, while others found the bright colors too unconventional for their taste.

Nevertheless, the Ruxton became a symbol of elegance and prestige, catering to those who desired a unique and vibrant driving experience.

Unfortunately, despite its initial success, the Ruxton Motor Co. faced financial difficulties due to the challenging economic climate and limited production capacity.

By 1931, the company ceased production, leaving behind a legacy of innovation coupled with a rich color palette that set the Ruxton apart from its contemporaries and from future generations of cars.

“The front-wheel drive eliminated the central driveshaft, providing a much-lower car than other cars of the period," according to Blackhawk. “The streamlined Woodlite headlamps were an accessory item and part of the overall design.”

Blackhawk said only 298 Ruxtons were built, and fewer than 20 are known to exist today.

Many of this era's cars were at least six feet from ground to roof top; the Ruxton was 53 inches, as opposed to 60).

Blackhawk has an admission fee or you can join and become a member.

ENGINE
8 cylinder, Continental L-head
3” bore, 4.75” stroke
268.6 cubic inch
100 hp. @ 3400 rpm

PRICE WHEN NEW
$3,915 (1930 dollar valuation)

BODY/COACHBUILDER
Budd Manufacturing Co.
Philadelphia, Penn.
MANUFACTURER
New Era Motors Inc.
New York, N.Y.
“The front-wheel drive eliminated the central driveshaft, providing a much-lower car than other cars of the period," according to Blackhawk. “The streamlined Woodlite headlamps were an accessory item and part of the overall design.”

Blackhawk said only 298 Ruxtons were built, and fewer than 20 are known to exist today.

Many of this era's cars were at least six feet from ground to roof top; the Ruxton was 53 inches, as opposed to 60).

Blackhawk has an admission fee or you can join and become a member.

ENGINE
8 cylinder, Continental L-head
3” bore, 4.75” stroke
268.6 cubic inch
100 hp. @ 3400 rpm

PRICE WHEN NEW
$3,915 (1930 dollar valuation)

BODY/COACHBUILDER
Budd Manufacturing Co.
Philadelphia, Penn.
MANUFACTURER
New Era Motors Inc.
New York, N.Y.


 


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