This 1932 Bugatti Type 50 One Of Only Two That Exist

August 24, 2023  •  Leave a Comment

Blackhawk Automotive Museum1932 Bugatti Type 50T“The Type 50 Bugatti design ~ both in mechanics and style ~ was greatly influenced by Ettore Bugatti's young son, Jean,” according to Blackhawk Automotive Museum where I took photos of a 1932 Bugatti Type 50T Profilé.

This very rare Bugatti is one of only two built and was featured at Danville, Calif.-based Blackhawk, but there is a possibility this car is no longer on display there. I haven’t been there for a few years.

“The Type 50, introduced in 1930, was intended to be a ‘super-sporting’ car with outstanding performance and style,” according to Blackhawk. “This was the first Bugatti to have twin overhead camshafts! Bugatti acquired a pair of Miller racing cars from Indianapolis 500 race driver Leon Duray. These cars were dismantled, and the vale-operating mechanics copied to produce a double overhead camshaft of the Bugatti Type 46 ~ the Type 50 engine.”

Total production was 65 chassis with a variety of bodies built by different body-makers.

“The last 20 cars built had a longer wheelbase and carried the Type 50T (Tourisme) designation,” according to Blackhawk. “The Profilé or ‘streamlined’ coachwork was designed by Jean, and as this is one of only two such cars that exist, it is significant because of its rarity and its radical design.

“The rake of the windscreen was considerably increased, and the cabin abruptly cuts off at the rear as the body is completed by the integrated trunk. The front fenders were raised, accentuated and extended. The impact of these lines is enhanced by contrasting pain colors.”

The engine was an 8-cylinder, DOHC powerhouse with a 3.38-inch bore and a 4.25-inch stroke. At 302.2 cubic inches, it boasted 200hp.

The body/coachbuilder and manufacturer was Automobiles E. Bugatti of Molsheim, France.
“The {1932} Type 50 Bugatti design ~ both in mechanics and style ~ was greatly influenced by Ettore Bugatti's young son, Jean,” according to Blackhawk Automotive Museum where I took photos of a 1932 Bugatti Type 50T Profilé.

This very rare Bugatti is one of only two built and was featured at Danville, Calif.-based Blackhawk, but there is a possibility this car is no longer on display there. I haven’t been there for a few years.

“The Type 50, introduced in 1930, was intended to be a ‘super-sporting’ car with outstanding performance and style,” according to Blackhawk. “This was the first Bugatti to have twin overhead camshafts! Bugatti acquired a pair of Miller racing cars from Indianapolis 500 race driver Leon Duray. These cars were dismantled, and the vale-operating mechanics copied to produce a double overhead camshaft of the Bugatti Type 46 ~ the Type 50 engine.”

Blackhawk Automotive Museum1932 Bugatti Type 50T“The Type 50 Bugatti design ~ both in mechanics and style ~ was greatly influenced by Ettore Bugatti's young son, Jean,” according to Blackhawk Automotive Museum where I took photos of a 1932 Bugatti Type 50T Profilé.

This very rare Bugatti is one of only two built and was featured at Danville, Calif.-based Blackhawk, but there is a possibility this car is no longer on display there. I haven’t been there for a few years.

“The Type 50, introduced in 1930, was intended to be a ‘super-sporting’ car with outstanding performance and style,” according to Blackhawk. “This was the first Bugatti to have twin overhead camshafts! Bugatti acquired a pair of Miller racing cars from Indianapolis 500 race driver Leon Duray. These cars were dismantled, and the vale-operating mechanics copied to produce a double overhead camshaft of the Bugatti Type 46 ~ the Type 50 engine.”

Total production was 65 chassis with a variety of bodies built by different body-makers.

“The last 20 cars built had a longer wheelbase and carried the Type 50T (Tourisme) designation,” according to Blackhawk. “The Profilé or ‘streamlined’ coachwork was designed by Jean, and as this is one of only two such cars that exist, it is significant because of its rarity and its radical design.

“The rake of the windscreen was considerably increased, and the cabin abruptly cuts off at the rear as the body is completed by the integrated trunk. The front fenders were raised, accentuated and extended. The impact of these lines is enhanced by contrasting pain colors.”

The engine was an 8-cylinder, DOHC powerhouse with a 3.38-inch bore and a 4.25-inch stroke. At 302.2 cubic inches, it boasted 200hp.

The body/coachbuilder and manufacturer was Automobiles E. Bugatti of Molsheim, France.
Total production was 65 chassis with a variety of bodies built by different body-makers.

“The last 20 cars built had a longer wheelbase and carried the Type 50T (Tourisme) designation,” according to Blackhawk. “The Profilé or ‘streamlined’ coachwork was designed by Jean, and as this is one of only two such cars that exist, it is significant because of its rarity and its radical design.

“The rake of the windscreen was considerably increased, and the cabin abruptly cuts off at the rear as the body is completed by the integrated trunk. The front fenders were raised, accentuated and extended. The impact of these lines is enhanced by contrasting pain colors.”

The engine was an 8-cylinder, DOHC powerhouse with a 3.38-inch bore and a 4.25-inch stroke. At 302.2 cubic inches, it boasted 200hp.

The body/coachbuilder and manufacturer was Automobiles E. Bugatti of Molsheim, France.

Blackhawk Automotive Museum1932 Bugatti Type 50T“The Type 50 Bugatti design ~ both in mechanics and style ~ was greatly influenced by Ettore Bugatti's young son, Jean,” according to Blackhawk Automotive Museum where I took photos of a 1932 Bugatti Type 50T Profilé.

This very rare Bugatti is one of only two built and was featured at Danville, Calif.-based Blackhawk, but there is a possibility this car is no longer on display there. I haven’t been there for a few years.

“The Type 50, introduced in 1930, was intended to be a ‘super-sporting’ car with outstanding performance and style,” according to Blackhawk. “This was the first Bugatti to have twin overhead camshafts! Bugatti acquired a pair of Miller racing cars from Indianapolis 500 race driver Leon Duray. These cars were dismantled, and the vale-operating mechanics copied to produce a double overhead camshaft of the Bugatti Type 46 ~ the Type 50 engine.”

Total production was 65 chassis with a variety of bodies built by different body-makers.

“The last 20 cars built had a longer wheelbase and carried the Type 50T (Tourisme) designation,” according to Blackhawk. “The Profilé or ‘streamlined’ coachwork was designed by Jean, and as this is one of only two such cars that exist, it is significant because of its rarity and its radical design.

“The rake of the windscreen was considerably increased, and the cabin abruptly cuts off at the rear as the body is completed by the integrated trunk. The front fenders were raised, accentuated and extended. The impact of these lines is enhanced by contrasting pain colors.”

The engine was an 8-cylinder, DOHC powerhouse with a 3.38-inch bore and a 4.25-inch stroke. At 302.2 cubic inches, it boasted 200hp.

The body/coachbuilder and manufacturer was Automobiles E. Bugatti of Molsheim, France.


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