Freesias Filled With Heavenly Fragrance

January 17, 2020  •  Leave a Comment

Cupertino flower photosFreesiasI grew these freesias in my Cupertino backyard. © Glenn Franco Simmons. All rights reserved worldwide.

by Glenn Franco Simmons

Stored within some of the petite flowering herbs known as freesias are aromas so divine that their fragrant impression upon one’s memory will not soon be forgotten.

The small conical corm from which they spring in late winter to early summer — depending upon variety — is no indication to the colorful splendor they will add to any flower garden. Nor is there any hint from such humble beginnings of the fragrances they will emit.

Cupertino FreesiasLavender FreesiasLavender freesias grown in my Cupertino backyard. © Glenn Franco Simmons. All rights reserved worldwide. Whether it’s a cool morning or a warm day, sans a strong wind, freesias will fill your garden with heavenly, but ephemeral, fragrances that will delight you.

Freesia, a flowering herbaceous perennial, is in the family of Iris (Iridaceae) that was first identified as a genus in 1866 by Christian Friedrich Ecklon and named after German botanist Friedrich Freese (1795-1876), according to Wikipedia.

So where does this beautiful, fragrant flower originate?

“It is native to the eastern side of southern Africa, from Kenya south to South Africa, {with} most species being found in Cape Provinces,” according to Wikipedia.

“Species of the former genus Anomatheca are now included in Freesia. The plants commonly known as ‘freesias’, with fragrant funnel-shaped flowers, are cultivated hybrids of a number of Freesia species. Some other species are also grown as ornamental plants.

“Due to their specific and pleasing scent,” Wikipedia continues, “they are often used in hand creams, shampoos, candles, etc.; however, the flowers are mainly used in wedding bouquets.”

Freesias are very hardy. In the United States, “they can be planted in the fall in USDA Hardiness Zones 9-10 (i.e. where the temperature does not fall below about 20F, and in the spring in Zones 4-8,” according to Wikipedia.

Visitors may view my freesia photos in the freesia gallery.


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