Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography: Blog https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog en-us (C) Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography (Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) Fri, 19 Feb 2021 02:32:00 GMT Fri, 19 Feb 2021 02:32:00 GMT https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/img/s/v-12/u65347338-o1056855695-50.jpg Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography: Blog https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog 120 120 Cherry Parfait Roses Added https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/cherry-parfait-roses-added I've added more Cherry Parfait Roses to the roses portfolio.

The beautiful Cherry Parfait Rose grows to two to five feet tall. I photographed Cherry Parfait roses at the San Jose Municipal Rose Garden in California.

The rose is an excellent choice for a variety of uses, including container-grown, flowering hedges, rose beds and borders.

Cherry Parfait is quite prolific and the bloom is wide, with 35 to 40 petals. It also has a mild fragrance.

Meilland International is the hybridizer.

 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) Cherry Parfait rose flower flowers Glenn Franco Simmons Meilland International rose roses San Jose https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/cherry-parfait-roses-added Fri, 19 Feb 2021 02:32:00 GMT
'I was heedless, Thou didst awaken me.' https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/i-was-heedless-thou-didst-awaken-me A prayer revealed by Bahá’u’lláh.'I was heedless'Please share if so inclined. Bahá’í Prayers. Bahá’í International Community. Used in accordance with BIC terms. Photo © Glenn Franco Simmons. My God, my Adored One, my King, my Desire! What tongue can voice my thanks to Thee? I was heedless, Thou didst awaken me. I had turned back from Thee, Thou didst graciously aid me to turn towards Thee. I was as one dead, Thou didst quicken me with the water of life. I was withered, Thou didst revive me with the heavenly stream of Thine utterance which hath flowed forth from the Pen of the All-Merciful.

O Divine Providence! All existence is begotten by Thy bounty; deprive it not of the waters of Thy generosity, neither do Thou withhold it from the ocean of Thy mercy. I beseech Thee to aid and assist me at all times and under all conditions, and seek from the heaven of Thy grace Thine ancient favor. Thou art, in truth, the Lord of bounty, and the Sovereign of the kingdom of eternity.
~ Bahá’u’lláh

Please share if so inclined.  Bahá’í Prayers. Bahá’í International Community. Used in accordance with BIC terms. Photo © Glenn Franco Simmons. 

 

 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) Bahá'í prayer Bahá'í prayers Bahá'í-inspired art Bahá'u'lláh dahlias floral art flowers prayer prayers religious art https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/i-was-heedless-thou-didst-awaken-me Fri, 12 Feb 2021 13:56:44 GMT
More San Jose Municipal Rose Garden Photos Added https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/more-san-jose-municipal-rose-garden-photos-added

The San Jose Municipal Rose Garden is located in the heart of Silicon Valley (Valley of Heart's Delight) in San Jose. It is easily accessible and open to the public without charge. The award-winning garden is one of America's most-prestigious rose gardens. While in Silicon Valley for about 10 years, I photographed a lot at the garden. Thanks to dedicated volunteers, the garden has been transformed from a more dilapidated state to a jewel of the San Francisco Bay Area. The slideshow above highlights my best photos from the garden.]]>
(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) Municipal Rose Garden rose photographer rose photographs rose photography rose photos San Jose Valley of Heart's Delight https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/more-san-jose-municipal-rose-garden-photos-added Thu, 11 Feb 2021 13:56:08 GMT
Francis Meilland Roses' Texture Softened https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/francis-meilland-roses-texture-softened "Rosa Francis Meilland" is also known as "Prince Jardinier" and "Schloss Ippenburg."

In the USA, it's known as the Francis Meilland Rose. I've added numerous photos where I've "softened" the image's texture digitally.

Developed by Alain Meilland, of Meilland International, in France in 2006, it has won awards in the United States and Europe.

It was named in honor of the Peace Rose creator, Francis Meilland.

It is a prolific rose, with up to 65 petals. Its foliage is dark green and at full height, it can reach about six feet.

Star Roses, a company I photographed for while in Cupertino, says Frances Meilland's fragrance is "strong, fruity and citrusy."

This photo was taken at the San Jose Municipal Rose Garden in California. The award-winning garden is a wonderful place to visit, so if you visit Silicon Valley, put this garden on your to-do list.

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) flower flower photographer flower photography flowers Francis Meilland Francis Meilland rose Francis Meilland roses Municipal Rose Garden rose rose photographer roses San Jose The Flower Photographer https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/francis-meilland-roses-texture-softened Sat, 06 Feb 2021 16:24:38 GMT
Big Basin Redwoods Before Wildfire https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/big-basin-redwoods-before-wildfire T This iconic photo shows a highway that meanders through Big Basin Redwoods State Park in the Santa Cruz Mountains of California. Here, it narrows to about one-lane wide. I've seen photos post-2020 wildfire of this area that is near park headquarters and all I saw was complete devastation. I doubt that a photo taken from where I stood a few years ago will look like this for decades, if not hundreds of years. The photo is copyrighted. Downloads of this compressed 1920x1080 photo is allowed, but you cannot sell it or use it commercially. The forest will, hopefully, come back over the next hundreds of years; that's why California Redwoods are called Sequoia Sempervirens (ever-living). Sprouts will come up from burned over trees that fall to the ground. But, for those of us alive today, it is a tragedy of Biblical scale.

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) ancient redwoods Big Basin Big Basin Redwoods California redwood redwood grove redwood landscape redwood landscapes redwoods Sequoia Sepervirens https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/big-basin-redwoods-before-wildfire Sat, 06 Feb 2021 00:49:34 GMT
Secret Rose Added To Portfolio https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/secret-rose-added-to-porfolio I've added a Secret Rose to my growing rose portfolio. Secret is a very beautiful and dainty rose; one of my favorites.

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) flower flowers Municipal Rose Garden rose roses San Jose Secret rose Secret roses https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/secret-rose-added-to-porfolio Thu, 04 Feb 2021 03:26:44 GMT
More Francis Meilland Roses Added https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/more-frances-meilland-roses-added "Rosa Francis Meilland" is also known as "Prince Jardinier" and "Schloss Ippenburg."

Developed by Alain Meilland, of Meilland International, in France in 2006, it has won awards in the United States and Europe.

It was named in honor of the Peace Rose creator, Francis Meilland.

It is a prolific rose, with up to 65 petals. Its foliage is dark green and at full height, it can reach about six feet.
Star Roses, a company I photographed for while in Cupertino, says Frances Meilland's fragrance is "strong, fruity and citrusy."

(Please note the photo used for display in this post has been considerably reduced in quality to prevent theft.)

 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) floral floral photography flower flower photographer flower photography flowers Frances Meilland Roses Francis Meilland rose Municipal Rose Garden Peace rose Peace roses Rosa Francis Meilland rose roses San Jose https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/more-frances-meilland-roses-added Thu, 04 Feb 2021 03:15:16 GMT
'What tongue can voice my thanks to Thee?' https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/what-tongue-can-voice-my-thanks-to-thee "My God, my Adored One, my King, my Desire! What tongue can voice my thanks to Thee?"My God, My Adored OneA prayer revealed by Bahá’u’lláh. My God, my Adored One, my King, my Desire! What tongue can voice my thanks to Thee? I was heedless, Thou didst awaken me. I had turned back from Thee, Thou didst graciously aid me to turn towards Thee. I was as one dead, Thou didst quicken me with the water of life. I was withered, Thou didst revive me with the heavenly stream of Thine utterance which hath flowed forth from the Pen of the All-Merciful.

O Divine Providence! All existence is begotten by Thy bounty; deprive it not of the waters of Thy generosity, neither do Thou withhold it from the ocean of Thy mercy. I beseech Thee to aid and assist me at all times and under all conditions, and seek from the heaven of Thy grace Thine ancient favor. Thou art, in truth, the Lord of bounty, and the Sovereign of the kingdom of eternity.
~ Bahá’u’lláh

Bahá’í Prayers. © Bahá’í International Community. Abstract Image © Glenn Franco Simmons

 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) Baha'i Faith Baha'i prayer Baha'i prayers Baha'u'llah prayer prayers https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/what-tongue-can-voice-my-thanks-to-thee Tue, 02 Feb 2021 19:47:18 GMT
'O Thou Whose face is the object of my adoration' https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/o-thou-whose-face-is-the-object-of-my-adoration "O Thou Whose face is the object of my adoration" is a prayer revealed by Bahá’u’lláh.Object Of My AdorationA prayer revealed by Bahá’u’lláh. O Thou Whose face is the object of my adoration, Whose beauty is my sanctuary, Whose habitation is my goal, Whose praise is my hope, Whose providence is my companion, Whose love is the cause of my being, Whose mention is my solace, Whose nearness is my desire, Whose presence is my dearest wish and highest aspiration, I entreat Thee not to withhold from me the things Thou didst ordain for the chosen ones among Thy servants. Supply me, then, with the good of this world and of the next.

Thou, truly, art the King of all men. There is no God but Thee, the Ever-Forgiving, the Most Generous.

~ Bahá’u’lláh


Bahá’í Prayers. © Bahá’í International Community. Abstract Image © Glenn Franco Simmons

 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) Baha'i Baha'i Faith Baha'i prayer Baha'i prayers prayer prayers https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/o-thou-whose-face-is-the-object-of-my-adoration Tue, 02 Feb 2021 19:40:38 GMT
Francis Meilland Rose Named After Peace Rose Creator https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/frances-meilland-rose-named-after-peace-rose-creator "Rosa Francis Meilland" is also known as "Prince Jardinier" and "Schloss Ippenburg."

Developed by Alain Meilland, of Meilland International, in France in 2006, it has won awards in the United States and Europe.

It was named in honor of the Peace Rose creator, Francis Meilland.

It is a prolific rose, with up to 65 petals. Its foliage is dark green and at full height, it can reach about six feet.

Star Roses, a company I photographed for while in Cupertino, says Frances Meilland's fragrance is "strong, fruity and citrusy."

This photo was taken at the San Jose Municipal Rose Garden in California. The award-winning garden is a wonderful place to visit, so if you visit Silicon Valley, put this garden on your to-do list.

(Please note the photo used for display in this post has been considerably reduced in quality to prevent theft.)

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) flower photographer flower photography Francis Meilland pink rose rose garden rose photography rose photos roses San Jose https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/2/frances-meilland-rose-named-after-peace-rose-creator Tue, 02 Feb 2021 02:17:01 GMT
1930 Marquette Introduced As 'Inexepensive' https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/1/1930-marquette-introduced-as-inexepensive 1930 Marquette1930 Marquette1930 Marquette at the National Car Museum in Reno. Marquette has been used on a few different brands and makes of cars over the years.

I photographed this 1930 Marquette at the National Car Museum in Reno in 2011. There were earlier, non-GM makes and brands of Marquette, but those models ceased after GM purchased two early automotive companies.

"Late in 1929, the Marquette was revived and introduced as an inexpensive companion line to Buick," according to the information display at the National Car Museum. "It was hoped the Marquette would pull Buick out of The {Great} Depression slump.

1930 Marquette1930 Marquette1930 Marquette. "The Marquette was a light, economical automobile offered in six body styles with wood-spoke wheels. Wire wheels and side-mounts were available accessories.

"The sport roadster was available in rumble seat style and featured a folding windshield and an access door for golf clubs and other sports equipment."

The museum said 35,007 Marquettes were produced, with 2,397 as sport roadster models.

The museum also noted that the Marquette had a lot of competition in the low-price bracket that it competed in. By the end of 1930, production ceased.

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) 1930 Marquette classic cars GM National Automobile Museum Nevada Reno https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/1/1930-marquette-introduced-as-inexepensive Sun, 31 Jan 2021 23:15:24 GMT
McWay Cove: Pearl Of Big Sur https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/1/mcway-cove-pearl-of-big-sur "McWay Falls is an 80-foot waterfall located in Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park that flows year-round," according to Wikipedia.

"This waterfall is one of only two in the region that are close enough to the ocean to be referred to as 'tidefalls', the other being Alamere Falls.

"The source of the waterfall is McWay Creek and is one of the few waterfalls that empty directly into the ocean.

Originally, the waterfall cascaded directly into the ocean but after a 1983 fire and 1985 landslides, the topography of McWay Cove was altered, forming an inaccessible beach. The waterfall now meets the ocean when the tide is in.

"On the edge of McWay Creek is a small building which houses a Pelton wheel, with signs that provide historical facts. Christopher McWay homesteaded the canyon in the late 1870s and eventually McWay's Saddle Rock Ranch was sold in the 1920s to Lathrop Brown and his wife, Helen Hooper Brown, who built two houses at Waterfall Overlook.

"In 1961 the approximately 1,800 acre property was donated by Helen Hooper Brown to the state for a park, to be named for Julia Pfeiffer Burns{,} ... located 37 miles south of Carmel. "Near its parking lot begins the half-mile Waterfall Trail, a dirt path heading westward toward the ocean, to a short tunnel under Highway 1, a right turn to a trail in the cliffside overlooking a small cove, to the sign 'overlook'.

"Although it can be viewed via a trail from above, the beach and scenic cove below are difficult to access by land; however, they can be easily reached by boat. Even with this possibility, it is not recommended that people visit the beach as a safety precaution due to crumbling cliffs and to preserve the environment."

High and flood tides can also make the beach extremely hazardous. On one of the days I photographed, two men were on the beach and within five minutes after they left, the entire beach was covered in an angry tidal flow ~ complete with waves. They would have easily been swept out to sea.

"Just upstream is 30-foot McWay Creek Falls, and on a smaller tributary is Canyon Trail Falls," Wikipedia notes. "Although a detailed history of the falls has yet to be completed, walking the creek from the highway culvert to the falls indicates that the last portion of the channel to the lip of the falls is artificial.

"It appears that the natural creek channel was along the lower declivity to the north (left) of the falls, which would have made a lower and less vertical cascade to the water in the cove. It appears that the re-routing of the creek to the present fall site was among the landscape changes made by the Browns in the building of the Waterfall House and grounds."

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) Big Sur Big Sur Coast McWay Cove McWay Waterfall McWay waterfalls Pacific Coast https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/1/mcway-cove-pearl-of-big-sur Sun, 31 Jan 2021 21:53:46 GMT
A Stunningly Beautiful Red PT-17 Stearman https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/1/a-stunningly-beautiful-red-pt-17-stearman PT-17 Stearman BiplanePT-17 Stearman BiplaneThis is one of three Boeing PT-17 Stearmans owned by Vintage Aircraft Co. at the South Sonoma Valley Airport. This is one of three Boeing PT-17 Stearmans owned by Vintage Aircraft Co. at the Sonoma Valley Airport. You may ride in it for the thrill of a lifetime. To find out rates and other information, visit Vintage Aircraft Co.'s Website.
 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) airport Sonoma Valley Stearman Stearmans vintage aircraft https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/1/a-stunningly-beautiful-red-pt-17-stearman Sun, 31 Jan 2021 00:39:00 GMT
More Saratoga Cherry Blossoms https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/1/more-saratoga-cherry-blossoms

I've added a lot of new cherry blossom photos to my cherry blossom gallery. The photos were taken in Saratoga, Calif. Many feature bees on the blossoms. The photos in this group also include photos taken of cherry blossoms in San Jose and Cupertino, Calif.

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) blossom blossoms cherry blossom cherry blossoms flowering Saratoga https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/1/more-saratoga-cherry-blossoms Sun, 31 Jan 2021 00:34:36 GMT
Filoli Has Beautiful Magnolias https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/1/filoli-has-beautiful-magnolias
Filoli is a magnificent country estate in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its magnolia blossoms start every January, providing photographers with many opportunities to photograph a variety of magnolia blossoms.

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) blossom blossoming blossoms Filoli flower flowers magnolia magnolias https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2021/1/filoli-has-beautiful-magnolias Mon, 18 Jan 2021 01:59:31 GMT
Bugatti's Son Influenced Type 57 Models https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/5/bugattis-son-influenced-type-57-models Hillsborough Concours d'Elegance1929 Type 57 BugattiThis beautiful 1929 Type 57 Bugatti was photographed at one of the Hillsborough Concours d’Elegances I attended. This beautiful 1929 Type 57 Bugatti was photographed at one of the Hillsborough Concours d’Elegances I attended.

Formerly in the John O’Quinn Collection, the Bugatti was owned, at the time this photo was taken, by the Academy of Art University in San Francisco, Calif., which acquired it in 2009.

“Powered by an advanced 3.3-liter twin-cam inline 8-cylinder engine, the Type 57 Bugatti is a fast, comfortable touring car,” according to a summary provided at the Hillsborough event.

“The supercharged version was introduced in 1937 and built for two years.

“Ettore Bugatti’s son Jean significantly influenced Type 57 coachwork and designed some of the most elegant Type 57s produced, including the rakish Atalante coupe. The body style is an interpretation of the 1935 Aérolithe coupe ~ essentially a prototype that reached very limited production in 1936 as the Type 57 Atlantic.

“The design was refined into the Atalante which included the Aérolithe’s teardrop shape, but with a flat windshield, a separate trunk area with recessed spare-tire and full-size doors that retained the signature kidney-bean windows. To maintain exclusivity, no two of the Type 57c Atalantes were the same.”

 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) Bugatti classic cars Hillsborough Concours d'Elegance rare car photos Type 57 vintage cars https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/5/bugattis-son-influenced-type-57-models Tue, 19 May 2020 05:15:10 GMT
1959 Scimitar Not A Great Design https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/5/1959-scimitar-not-a-great-design National Automobile Museum photos1959 Scimitar1959 Scimitar at the National Automobile Museum in Reno, Nev. This 1959 Scimitar may not be one of the Chrysler Corp.’s best designs, but it is interesting.

It was difficult to photograph at the National Automobile Museum in Reno, Nev., when I visited quite a few years ago, but I did my best to try to photograph a car that you soon will not forget.

Built in Detroit, its 413-cubic-inch engine was power-packed with 8 cylinders that could reach 350 hp.

“The Scimitar was designed and developed to suggest functional and decorative applications for aluminum in automobiles,” states a museum car summary. “The Scimitar project was sponsored by Olin Mathieson Chemical Corp. and was designed and built by Brooks Stevens Associates and Reutter & Co.

“A two-door Scimitar convertible was representative of boulevard-type sports cars, having a hard top that retracted automatically into the luggage area.

National Automobile Museum1959 ScimitarThis 1959 Scimitar may not be one of the Chrysler Corp.’s best designs, but it is interesting. It was difficult to photograph at the National Automobile Museum in Reno, Nev., when I visited, but I did my best to try to photograph a car that you soon will not forget. “A four-door Scimitar town car phaeton could be driven as a fully enclosed formal sedan, a town car with partially retracted roof, or an open convertible with both roofs retracted into the luggage area.

“The Scimitar station sedan, as displayed here, was intended as a family all-purpose car. Three types of cars were derived from the same basic design and tooling, and 1959 Chrysler New Yorker chassis ere used.

“The body utilized removable aluminum anodized quarter panels for reduced maintenance and aesthetics. The grill, bumpers, trim, wheel discs and many interior treatments are of brushed and anodized aluminum, substantially reducing the vehicle weight. The car’s name was derived from the shape of a scimitar, a saber with a curved blade.

“Three Scimitar models were exhibited first at the 1959 Geneva Auto Show, then at the 1961 International Automobile Show in New York.”

 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) 1959 Scimitar car photos Chrysler classic cars National Automobile Museum Nevada Reno vintage cars https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/5/1959-scimitar-not-a-great-design Tue, 19 May 2020 04:49:29 GMT
Six Original 1941 Chyrsler Newports; Four Left https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/5/six-original-1941-chyrsler-newports-four-left National Automobile Museum photos1941 Chrysler Newport1941 Chrysler Newport Dual Cowl Phaeton. This 1941 Chrysler Newport (Dual Cowl Phaeton) was photographed a few years ago at the National Automobile Museum in Reno, Nev.

“The Chrysler Newport, one of the last dual phaetons, was designed by Ralph Roberts and custom-built by LeBaron Carrossiers in Detroit, Mich.,” according to the museum. “The car features an all-aluminum body, concealed headlamps, folding windshield and hide-away top.

“There were a total of six Newports constructed by Chrysler as show vehicles and four are known to exist today.”

In 1940, one of these Newports was chosen as the Indianapolis 500 pace car.

“This was the first and is still the only time a non-production car has been used in this event,” the museum noted.

This beauty would have cost $4,725 new. It features an 8-cylinder, 325-horsepower engine with a 3 ¼” and a 4 7/8” stroke. Engine displacement is 323.5 cubic inches.

 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) 1941 Chrysler Newport Chrysler classic cars Nevada Newport Reno https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/5/six-original-1941-chyrsler-newports-four-left Tue, 19 May 2020 04:22:14 GMT
1930 Chrysler Series 70 A Rare Beauty https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/5/1930-chrysler-series-70 Palo Alto Concours d'Elegance1930 Chrysler Series 70 RoadsterThis 1930 Chrysler Series 70 was a step up from the Chrysler Series 66 and not as costly as the company's Series 77. It was photographed at the 2010 Palo Alto Concours d'Elegance in the San Francisco Bay Area.

by Glenn Franco Simmons

This 1930 Chrysler Series 70 was a step up from the Chrysler Series 66 and not as costly as the company's Series 77. It was photographed at the 2010 Palo Alto Concours d'Elegance in the San Francisco Bay Area.
 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) 1930 Chrysler Series 70 Chrysler classic car classic car photos classic cars concours d'elegance Palo Alto https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/5/1930-chrysler-series-70 Fri, 01 May 2020 15:30:00 GMT
1924 Hispano-Suiza Features Tulipwood https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/5/1924-hispano-suiza-features-tulipwood Blackhawk car photos1924 Hispano-SuizaThis 1924 Hispano-Suiza Model H6C Tulipwood Torpedo was photographed at the Danville, Calif.-based Blackhawk Automotive Museum. by Glenn Franco Simmons
This 1924 Hispano-Suiza Model H6C Tulipwood Torpedo was photographed at the Danville, Calif.-based Blackhawk Automotive Museum.

"In 1924, the Tulipwood Torpedo was commissioned by André Dubonnet who, at the age of 26, was an accomplished and well-known aviator and driver," according to Blackhawk, where this vehicle was displayed at the time the photo was taken.

"The Dubonnet family had amassed a fortune from the aperitifs and cognacs that continue to bear the family name.

"Dubonnet contracted the Nieuport Aviation Co. to build a lightweight body suitable for both racing and touring.

Blackhawk car photos1924 Hispano-SuizaThis 1924 Hispano-Suiza Model H6C Tulipwood Torpedo was photographed at the Danville, Calif.-based Blackhawk Automotive Museum. "Nieuport craftsmen formed a frame of wooden ribs measuring up to 3/4-inch thick that were covered with 1/8-inch wooden veneer. Strips of tulipwood of uneven thickness and length were fastened to the veneer with thousands of brass rivets

"The body was then sealed, sanded and varnished. When fully equipped, the body was to have eight approximately 160 pounds. The torpedo tail enclosed a 46-gallon gas tank for long-distance racing. In 1924, Dubonnet entered the Hispano-Suiza in the Sicilian Targa Florio and he finished sixth."

Blackhawk said he finished fifth in the Coppa Florio and first in the over 4.5-liter class in this one-of-a-kind vintage beauty that boasts a 6-cylinder, SOHC engine with a 4.33-inch bore and 5.51-inch stroke. It's 487 cubic inches featured 200hp @ 3050rpm. When new, it cost $15,000 in 1924 dollars. It was built by Nieuport Aviation Co. of Bois-Colombes, France. It was manufactured in Sté. Française, France.

 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) 1924 Hispano-Suiza Blackhawk Blackhawk Automotive Museum cars classic car photos classic cars torpedo cars vintage car photos https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/5/1924-hispano-suiza-features-tulipwood Fri, 01 May 2020 15:25:31 GMT
Electric Ingenuity On The Comstock Lode https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/4/electric-ingenuity-on-the-comstock-lode by Glenn Franco Simmons
With the wealth derived from silver and gold mining on The Comstock Lode, there were many industrial advances that led the world technologically.

One of these was electricity.

In his book, "My Memories of The Comstock," 26-year (1877- 1903) Comstock resident Harry M. Gorham spoke of kerosene used to light lamps — from in-home use to lighting mine operations.

"There were student and other patterns for homes," he wrote, "and large reflecting lamps of locomotive type in the hoisting works and for the benefit of the hoisting engineers. To clean and care for them, to distribute the various oils and greases, and to pick the cotton from the bales for the use of the mechanics, was, in early all of the works, the duty of one man. The question of light, then, was a serious one when it is considered that the question of speed in all departments meant greater or lesser cost per ton."

Soon to follow kerosene were the telephone and electric light, Mr. Gorham added. However, since such work was laborious to maintain kerosene lighting, another alternative had to be found for industrial-grade lighting.

"There had been a gas plant making gas from wood, and some individual places had gas made from gasoline," he wrote. "But the wood gas was not satisfactory, and the difficulty in in keeping the distributing lines free from breaks due to moving ground finally led to the establishment of an electric light plant by the water company. Soon this form of lighting was extended all over the territory."

It didn't take long for Comstock-based engineers to come up with an alternative to producing electricity.


"As discoveries in the use of electricity were progressing constantly," Mr. Gorham wrote, "and as the water company had an excess of water, a plan was devised for the purpose of developing power by use of such excess water. The Nevada Mill stood adjacent to the works of the Chollar Mine shaft, which was one thousand feet deep. A large station was excavated at the level, and a contract was made with the Brush Company of Cleveland, Ohio, which installed electric generators at the point. The water was first run through a turbine on the surface, thence conducted down the shaft to the generators, and the power thus secured conducted back through the shaft to the motors at the mill."

 

Mr. Gorham noted the innovative solution to produce electricity for the mill.


"In spite of the crudeness of the machines, “he wrote, "in spite of the belief that the Brush machines ran backward, power was developed which lifted the stamps, turned the pans and settlers. I think it was calculated that the machine delivered about fifty percent of generated power."


He contrasted that technology with the technology at the time he wrote years later and that was published in 1939 by Suttonhouse.

"Visit any plant using electric power today," he wrote. "Smooth, silent, the very epitome of energy and ability; compare it with that inferno a thousand feet underground. Sparks jumped twenty feet, accompanied by roaring and squeaking, and enough electricity escaping to light up the entire chamber. It is a wonder that electrocutions were not the order of the day and night.

"Nevertheless, it pulled, and although that installation is now a memory only, I believe it will be found that in electrical history this was a pioneer, the classic distribution of electricity for power use."

So, what happened to all the water?

"It ran out through a connection from those workings with the Sutro Tunnel; the only use, as far as I know, the tunnel ever was to the Chollar Mine," Mr. Gorham wrote. "It was in very truth a Quixotic scheme. The science was in its infancy, the installation is costly. As one observer exclaimed, "'It must have been very costive!'"

As he did throughout his book, Mr. Gorham wondered aloud.

"That is all past and gone," he wrote, "but the history of it remains. And what would the world be today if all the Quixotic schemes that have ever been exploited all the years that men have tried to civilize themselves, were cast aside in the discard? "Meanwhile the art of manufacturing and distributing electric energy over distances was more and more successfully accomplished."

Time moves on.

 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) chollar comstock comstock lode electricity henry gorham mining virginia city https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/4/electric-ingenuity-on-the-comstock-lode Sat, 25 Apr 2020 03:04:15 GMT
Harry Gorham Recounts Flywheel Saga https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/4/harry-gorham-recounts-flywheel-saga

 

by Glenn Franco Simmons
In his book, titled "My Memories of The Comstock," Harry M. Gorham writes about an industrious effort that remains impressive.

"So now I take you back to sometime in the early 80's, I think it was," he wrote. "The machinery had been installed, the pump engine, all except the flywheel. That had been let out at contract secured by the George Emmett Foundry in Gold Hill, the Gold Hill Foundry, with George Emmett, proprietor, John Pitchford, chief engineer and designer."

With 26 years lived on The Comstock Lode, the effort to move that flywheel was cemented into Gorham's memory. 

"It was a momentous hour in the history of deep mining, anyway, in Gold Hill," writes Mr. Gorham, who was born nearly 100 years to the day before my birth. "I have to rely on memory, but the day came when the casting was complete, and was ready to be hauled from lower Gold Hill to the New Yellow Jacket. I think the weight was forty thousand pounds, and it was about fifty feet in diameter. Due to its size, it could not be brought by the usual road, for it would have to pass through a tunnel, and the diameter forbade.

"So it had to be hauled up the steep main street, to the Divide. Who could haul it? Who could superintend such a trip and tour? Who could load it and unload it? Remember, the main street itself was tortuous, and at points had as much as twenty percent pitch. Well, there was one man and his assistant: Tom Gallagher, and his foreman, Ed Swift.

"There was an exhibition of sill, my children. Fifty horses (maybe to be accurate, forty-eight), hitched to tremendous wagons, groaning under the weight of this huge casting, the greatest haul that had ever been attempted in Nevada. It was a thrilling sight to watch the management of that haul, around corners where the leaders could not pull and the strain fell on those nearer, just missing posts on the turns, the quiet control of the animals and their response, over the Divide down C Street; where the load broke into a sewer and was hoisted out; down Taylor Street, into another sewer; hoisted out again, a section of Finlan's wood yard cut away. I cannot tell you more, but it was an epic of horse power and man's intelligence. It arrived, was unloaded, and hoisted up to and swung onto the great shaft of the pump engine.

"Today, we would simply hitch a Caterpillar onto it, and whisk it over the hill. At that time, it was a titanic task.

"I am not sure how long that pump ran. It is a little hazy in my memory, and I am not one to look up days or weeks or months or years; it does not matter, really. You see, that engine was turning over at the rate of three, four, five, maybe six strokes a minute, trembling a little with the effort, the visible struggle. And one day, what was it that happened? I think perhaps no one knew, simply guessed; maybe a counterbalance bolt gave way, maybe a hidden defect was present somewhere, maybe the spidery radius rods of the flywheel couldn't endure the thought of endless effort. Whatever it was, one day, the flywheel that had cost so much money and effort, that had so buoyed up the hopes and promised so much, fell to pieces, a thousand pieces of iron. And with it the hopes and dreams of all who probed and dug and delved in that part of the great Lode."

 

 

 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) Comstock Lode flywheel Gold Hill mining Nevada https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/4/harry-gorham-recounts-flywheel-saga Tue, 21 Apr 2020 00:33:25 GMT
Freesias Filled With Heavenly Fragrance https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/1/fragrant-freesias

by Glenn Franco Simmons

Stored within some of the petite flowering herbs known as freesias are aromas so divine that their fragrant impression upon one’s memory will not soon be forgotten.

The small conical corm from which they spring in late winter to early summer — depending upon variety — is no indication to the colorful splendor they will add to any flower garden. Nor is there any hint from such humble beginnings of the fragrances they will emit.

Whether it’s a cool morning or a warm day, sans a strong wind, freesias will fill your garden with heavenly, but ephemeral, fragrances that will delight you.

Freesia, a flowering herbaceous perennial, is in the family of Iris (Iridaceae) that was first identified as a genus in 1866 by Christian Friedrich Ecklon and named after German botanist Friedrich Freese (1795-1876), according to Wikipedia.

So where does this beautiful, fragrant flower originate?

“It is native to the eastern side of southern Africa, from Kenya south to South Africa, {with} most species being found in Cape Provinces,” according to Wikipedia.

“Species of the former genus Anomatheca are now included in Freesia. The plants commonly known as ‘freesias’, with fragrant funnel-shaped flowers, are cultivated hybrids of a number of Freesia species. Some other species are also grown as ornamental plants.

“Due to their specific and pleasing scent,” Wikipedia continues, “they are often used in hand creams, shampoos, candles, etc.; however, the flowers are mainly used in wedding bouquets.”

Freesias are very hardy. In the United States, “they can be planted in the fall in USDA Hardiness Zones 9-10 (i.e. where the temperature does not fall below about 20F, and in the spring in Zones 4-8,” according to Wikipedia.

Visitors may view my freesia photos in the freesia gallery.

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) floral flower flower photography flowers fragrant flower fragrant flowers freesia freesias Glenn Franco Simmons https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/1/fragrant-freesias Fri, 17 Jan 2020 17:05:39 GMT
Virginia City's Victorian Splendor https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/1/virginia-city by Glenn Franco Simmons

Hidden below the main street of Virginia City is an example of Victorian splendor.

It's a refined beauty painted in a beautiful yellow that would make two of California's cities with significant preserved Victorian structures — The Victorian Seaport of Eureka and The Victorian Village of Ferndale — envious.

Rising out of a still-steep hillside at 146 D  St. in the epicenter of the richest U.S. silver ore discovery is the Savage Mining Building, also known as the Savage Mansion.

"This magnificent 21-room Second Empire Style building was constructed by the Savage Mining Co. in 1861," according to the National Park Service's webpage about what is often referred to as the Savage Mansion.

"The ornate building is an excellent example of the architectural elegance associated with the offices and residences of the mining elite," the NPS states. "The top two floors of the building served as the mine superintendent's residence, while the ground floor was the mine office."

The beautifully adorned building is privately owned. The NPS said it presently serves as an office building.

"{It} has been restored with attention to its distinctive architectural features, such as the mansard roof, dormer windows and delicate gingerbread trim," according to the NPS. "The interior boasts 14-foot-high ceilings, a seven-foot copper bathtub, a {Lincrusta} frieze in the main hallway and early Victorian furnishings."

Aside from its architectural important, the Savage building is also historically important — perhaps most notably because a U.S. president once spoke there to a gathered crowd who must have been impressed that so distinguished a person would make a stop in the Comstock capital.

"Ulysses S. Grant is said to have stayed in the house in 1879 and addressed crowds in a speech from the porch. During this time, a Mrs. Monoghan, whose husband had been killed in one of the mines, served as a housekeeper to the superintendent.

"When the mines closed down in 1918, the Savage Mining Co. deeded the land, house and furnishings to Mrs. Monoghan."

In the rough-and-tumble and oft-greedy world of The Comstock Lode, such a gesture was probably not too common.

The NPS said it is being used as office space. When I was there, a woman came out of the building and moved her car for me so I could get some better shots, which I appreciated a lot.

"The term 'mansion' has been liberally applied in the Comstock to include any large and vaguely residential building," the NPS sates. "This has been done for promotional purposes and is far from being an accurate characterization. Even the most elaborate dwellings in Virginia City would be considered no more than ordinary houses in any urban setting.

"In the case of the Savage, Gould & Curry and Chollar properties, all referred to as mansions, the term is a complete misnomer, having been applied to buildings that served primarily as offices for major mining companies."

I was reared in a small, forested valley not far from a small city with a unique historic Victorian architectural history of The Victorian Seaport of Eureka, Calif., and I have to say that this former office would be considered a mansion, even among Eureka's beautifully preserved Victorians.

This Virginia City landmark would also be at home in one of my favorite cities in California, The Victorian Village of Ferndale.

Call it what you want, it's a true beauty.

(Editor's note: These photos were taken with my smartphone. I plan to return to Virginia City to take photos with my professional gear, which will enable me to take much better photos. My dream is to be able to tour this grand Victorian and take photos inside.)

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) Comstock Lode Glenn Franco Simmons mine miner mining Nevada Savage Mansion Victorian Virginia City https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/1/virginia-city Wed, 08 Jan 2020 03:37:33 GMT
Lady Justice's Eyes Open https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/1/lady-justice by Glenn Franco Simmons

One of the most-impressive buildings in Virginia City, Nev., is the ornate — by Wild West standards — Storey County Courthouse at 26 South B. St.

Located near the equally historic Piper's Opera House, the courthouse is an impressive structure that must have magnificent views of Virginia City northward, from its second-story windows. Whether standing inside or outside the courthouse, which features a jail and courtroom, it is easy to imagine the destinies of lives forever changed in this building.

The National Park Service's "Three Historic Nevada Cities" series features historically important information about Carson City, Reno and Virginia City.

"The Storey County Courthouse was built in the high Italianate style that embodies 19th-century ideals of decorative opulence as well as law and order," according to the NPS."

It replaced the first courthouse, which was destroyed the catastrophic Virginia City Great Fire of October 1875.

"Reconstruction began in 1876 and the present building, designed by the San Francisco architectural firm of Kenitzer and Raun and built by contractor Peter Burke, was completed in February 1877," according to the NPS. "The total cost of construction, including fixtures and the jail, was $117,000, a remarkable sum even for the Comstock boom years."

It even features a memorable and iconic sculpture.

"A life-sized figure of Justice stands as sentry at the entrance, but she is not blindfolded, a rare occurrence in our national symbology," according to the NPS.

The Comstock Historical Marker (No. 8) that is located outside the courthouse (at the time this photo was taken) states that "over the years, a legend has evolved that she {Justice} was one of only a few created not blindfolded."

"The courthouse's statue of Justice is the only one to grace the exterior of a Nevada building," according to OnlineNevada. "The full-sized, zinc figure came from New York and cost $236, including shipping. Local folklore maintains it is one of two or three in the nation without a blindfold, presumably because the Wild West needed Justice to pursue crime vigorously. In fact, Justice with eyes exposed was a common option in the nineteenth century, and over twenty examples survive throughout the country."

In Virginia City, all enforcement had to have its eyes wide open because it was the epitome of Wild West skulduggery.

"The façade of the building was decorated with elaborate ironwork, painted contrasting colors, and a pediment that included the date of construction, 1876, also the national centennial," the NPS states.

The NPS also said the Storey County Courthouse is the most opulent of all Nevada courthouses built in the late 19th century.

"Far exceeding the cost of its counterparts, the building served the state's richest community," the NPS states. "Ironically, the county built the courthouse at a time when the boom economy of Virginia City was on the verge of collapse. Perhaps due to the inevitability of a downturn, local leaders rebuilt their town following the devastating 1875 fire in grand style.

"The Storey County Courthouse remains a vivid example of this community's rebirth in the face of economic decline. A portion of its restoration was funded through a grant from the National Park Service's Historic Preservation Fund."

It is a building that needs to continue to be kept up because of its historical significance as not only a courthouse, but also a jail.

"Storey County's two-story Italianate structure includes a two-tier jail, a spacious courtroom, and large iron-sheathed vaults for records," according to OnlineNevada. "Electrified during The {Great} Depression, the courtroom features Art Deco style light fixtures. The building is one of two 19th-century courthouses (the other being in Eureka) still serving local government."

According to another Comstock Historical Marker (No. 17) outside the courthouse, "This two-story jail was completed in 1877, and featured 10 individual cells, each of which had bunkbeds and 'state-of-the-art' plumbing for the day."

Men and women were jailed there.

"Women were housed on the second level and men on the first floor until 1963, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that males and females could not occupy the same facility without being physically separated," according to the marker. "There was heavy wire mesh strung between the posts of the second level to prevent falls and mingling of the inmates.

"The jail operated continuously from 1877 until September of 1986, when the county's insurance carrier decided it was unwise to operate it with only one fire exit in the event of a fire. Inmates were then housed at the Carson City Sheriff's Jail, for a fee, until the current jail was opened in 1992 on the outskirts of town on Truck Route, SR341."

Security was built into the jail.

"The walls of the jail were covered in boiler plate, after a successful escape in 1897 by an alleged murderer who had worked on the building as a bricklayer," according to the marker. "'Red Mike' Langan knew the walls had not been properly filled with rubble material as required and was able to dig his way out and escape. The county went to great expense to see that this did not happen again."

The marker makes no mention of Mr. Langan being caught, and I have not been able to determine if he was re-imprisoned.

"The doors of the jail were built by C.F. Nutting of San Francisco, the same company that supplied the vaults in the rest of the courthouse," the marker notes. "The stone floors are made of 'Kate's Peak Andesite," a very dense and heavy granite which was quarried from the hills a short distance to the east of Virginia City."

(Photos © Glenn Franco Simmons.)

 

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) Nevada Store County Courthouse Virginia City https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/1/lady-justice Wed, 08 Jan 2020 02:57:31 GMT
Silver City's Amity Lodge Remains Active https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/1/amity-lodge by Glenn Franco Simmons

Travelers might notice the well-cared-for white building with blue trim in Silver City, Nev., without realizing it is part of a living history that dates all the way back to the origins of The Comstock Lode.

Silver City's Amity Lodge No. 4 F. & A.M. — located at 175 Main St. — was chartered in 1863.

"Amity Lodge No. 4 had its beginnings as Silver City Lodge No. 163," according to Amity Lodge's website. "Sojourning Masons living in Silver City, Nevada, under the guidance of Brother John C. Currie expressed their desire to organize a lodge, by framing a petition to the Grand Lodge of California.

"A dispensation was granted by Grand Master William C. Belcher on March 20, 1863, to the sundry Brethren at Silver City, Nevada Territory, and a charter was granted by the Grand Lodge of California on May 15, 1863, as Silver City Lodge No. 163.

"The officers and members included — John C. Currie, W. M.; Charles F. Brant, S. W.; William B. Hickok, J. W.; August Koneman, Treasurer; Henry W. Arnold, Secretary; James A. Cowden, S. D.; Moses J. Rourke, J. D.; Henry Lun, Tyler. Other members included Master Masons M. J. Henley, R. P. Kerr, and Robert H. Watson.

"Lodge membership increased to 36 Master Masons, 4 Fellow Craft, and 12 Entered Apprentices in 1865, when the Lodge severed it connection to the Grand Lodge of California, and united with other Lodges in the organization of the Grand Lodge of Nevada, from which it received a charter at the time as Amity Lodge No. 4 on January 16, 1865. "Its first Master, Brother John C. Currie, withdrew, and united with Virginia City Lodge at Virginia City, and was elected Grand Master of Masons of the State of Nevada, and also served as Mayor of Virginia City. Brother Richard T. Mullard was the last Master under California jurisdiction, and Master under newly formed Amity Lodge No. 4, he would later became Deputy Grand Master."

There is a stated meeting first Thursday of each month at Amity Lodge.

To contact the Lodge, here are its mailing details: P.O. Box 11332, Reno, NV. 89510-1332.

An excellent historical resource about Freemasonry in Nevada is located on the History of the Grand Lodge of Nevada webpage. The Grand Lodge's home page is also a good starting point to learn more about Freemasonry and Freemasonry in Nevada.

There are many misconceptions about Free & Accepted Masons, so I refer readers to an excellent rebuttal to common fallacies regarding Freemasonry that the Grand Lodge of Virginia published: "Myths of Freemasonry."

(Photos taken by Glenn may be used without restriction by Masons. For Masons, photo credit is not required.)

In January 2020, I added more photos to the Amity Lodge gallery.

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) Amity Lodge Masonic Masonic Lodge Masonry Masons Silver City https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/1/amity-lodge Wed, 08 Jan 2020 01:52:16 GMT
Washoe Lodge Long Defunct https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/1/washoe-lodge by Glenn Franco Simmons

Washoe City and the surrounding valley were once known for significant economic and agricultural industriousness.

Within the social milieu of the new decade of the 1860s that saw significant economic changes — before Nevada statehood — were Freemasons who wanted to create a Masonic Lodge in search of that brotherly fraternity that an active lodge can further cement.

"The urge for Masonic intercourse in Washoe City was felt by the sojourning brethren, resulting in the establishment of a lodge under California registry," stated the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Mason of Nevada on its website*. "It is inconceivable, but it is nevertheless true, that but small attention was paid by the officers of the Grand Lodge of California, to the organization of Washoe lodge, No. 157 chartered under California register in July 1862."

If I correctly understand the Washoe Lodge's history, it was charted as a Nevada Lodge in 1863, ceasing to be a California-affiliated lodge.

"It is interesting to note, that at that time Washoe Lodge had an enrollment of 36 members," according to the Nevada Masons. "Not an unusual numerical list it is true, but among its number were those who were nevertheless sincere and devoted brethren, through whose instrumentalities the lodge grew and spread its Masonic light; men who figured prominently in municipal, county and state affairs, and brought fame and honor to themselves and the section from which they hailed; some of whom afterward crossed over into California, becoming identified with its commercial, industrial, political and social life, adding luster to the honor roll of that state. For, the Masons who pioneered the way in Washoe Lodge were men of outstanding merit and integrity; they took a leading part not only in Masonic affairs, but in public life as well; some of them attained not only public honor, but also became wealthy."

The Nevada Masons' website mentions a few prominent men, so if you want to learn more about them, I strongly suggest you visit the website.

The Lodge cannot be separated from Washoe Valley's and Washoe City's golden days, as noted by the Masons:

"The history of Washoe Lodge begins in the winter of 1860-61, and is cast in that period of glamour and excitement, attendant upon the discovery and development of The Comstock Lode, dating from Jan. 28, 1859, when James Finney, or 'Old Virginia,' made a rich strike in Gold Hill, and Henry Comstock, Patrick McLaughlin, Peter O’Reilly, Emanuel Penrod and Kentuck Osborne came into the picture, and Sandy Bowers and his wife Eilley Orrum, rose to opulence, whose reckless extravagance and final relapse into almost poverty, is a story of human pity and interest." 

In colorful writing, the Nevada Masons' website notes the synergy between the growth of Masonry in Nevada and The Comstock Lode:

"The story of the blue-black clay, secret of the wealth of the Comstock, at first cursed by the miners and thrown upon the dump as worthless — but afterward by an accident found to contain $1,595 in silver, and $4,790 in gold values per ton — precipitat{ed} a 'rush,' the scenes and excitement of which no pen could hope to portray, for they are deep-dyed with the richest color of comedy, pathos and tragedy, acts of heroism, self-denial, intrigue, shame and honor, but inextricably interwoven into the history of Washoe County.

"For when the great discovery was made on Mt. Davidson, or Sun Peak Mountain, Washoe Valley leaped into prominence for it had fuel and timber for building, plenty of water and fine rich land for farming; and from it the Comstock could be and was supplied. It soon assumed importance and following the necessary location surveys made in the spring of 1861, Washoe City came into being, began to grow and for the next five or six years, enjoyed a substantial and steady expansion."

In 1866, Washoe City became the county seat of Washoe County; however, it's a distinction that would be short-lived:

"With the coming of the V. & T. Railway, {Washoe City's} decline commenced," the Nevada Masons note. "Reno wanted the county seat, and on Aug. 5, 1868, a petition signed by 750 residents of Reno was sent to the county commissioners asking for the removal of the county seat to Reno. This petition was denied, but another was framed and sent in February 1870. Washoe City made a protest, and sent William Webster and William Boardman to plead their case, while Thomas E. Hayden appeared for Reno. The petition was withdrawn, but another was soon presented."

A special election was held on June 14, 1870 to settle the matter.

"Reno won by a vote of 544 to 362," according to the Nevada Masons. "Washoe then applied to the courts for redress, resulting in a bill being sent to the Legislature, which was passed, declaring Reno to be the county seat on and after April 3, 1871. It was the doom of the valley city; an early exodus of many of the residents followed, business became stagnant and, while for the next 18 years or more, a settlement continued to exist on the old site of the town, yet its progressive spirit was broken, and one by one its citizens departed to other fields."

Washoe City slowly declined. I've found several photos that may or may not be Washoe Lodge No. 2; however, there is one from the University of Nevada Reno that clearly states it is the site of the lodge. From that photo, it appears that others may also show that building. Any suggestions and/or corrections would be appreciated.

There are many misconceptions about Free & Accepted Masons, so I refer readers to an excellent rebuttal to common fallacies regarding Freemasonry that the Grand Lodge of Virginia published: "Myths of Freemasonry."

* Quotes from the Nevada Masons' website have been edited for AP Style.

Masons are free to use photos I've personally taken however they want, commercially or noncommercially.

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) Masonic Masonic Lodge Masonry Masons Nevada Washoe City Washoe Lodge https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2020/1/washoe-lodge Wed, 08 Jan 2020 01:18:23 GMT
Diana Deluxe A Stylish 1928 Car https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2019/7/diana-deluxe-a-stylish-1928-car The Nethercutt Collection1928 Diana Deluxe1928 Diana Deluxe at The Nethercutt Collection. by Glenn Franco Simmons

This 1928 Diana Deluxe features an L-head, straight-8 engine with a peak horsepower of 72. It was photographed at The Nethercutt Collection in Sylmar, Calif., a few years ago. I haven't been back to see if it's still there.

“In Roman mythology, Diana is the goddess of the Moon,” states a Nethercutt display summary next to the vehicle. “An appropriate name because Diana was manufactured by the Moon Motor Co. of St. Louis, Mo.

The Nethercutt Collection1928 Diana DeluxeThis 1928 Diana Deluxe was photographed at The Nethercutt Collection in Sylmar, Calif. “The Diana was a very stylish and well-built automobile that took most of its cues from the Belgian automobile company ‘Minerva,” another famous car with a goddesses’ name.”

This Diana cost $2,195 in 1928 dollars when new.

There are more photos in the gallery. Just click on the photo above, and from there, you can navigate to the 1928 Diana Deluxe gallery.

Nethercutt features far more than cars. Make sure you take the unguided tour and the guided tour (make reservations), which are both free.

“Opened in 1971, The Nethercutt Collection is a not-for-profit educational institution and a resource for automobile enthusiasts, historians, students and scholars. It is open to the public at no charge. {It} features rare collectibles ranging from mechanical musical instruments and antique furniture to the true heart of the collection: over 250 American and European automobiles dating from 1898 to 1997,” according to The Nethercutt Collection’s website. “Founder J.B. Nethercutt spent a lifetime establishing this collection of historic importance. Unique to automobile museums, each car on display is attentively serviced and maintained to remain as drivable as when the vehicle originally rolled off the showroom floor. On view are various Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance winners and cars once owned by movie stars, royalty and other notable personalities.

“The entire collection is housed in two beautifully appointed exhibit facilities located just north of Los Angeles. Housed in the Museum is the Nethercutt Automotive Research Library and Archives , one of the world’s top automotive research facilities. Just steps outside the Museum are a resplendently restored steam locomotive and railcar.”

If you love cars and American memorabilia, The Nethercutt Collection has to be on your bucket list.

(Photography at The Nethercutt Collection is allowed for personal use, as is my photography. I do not sell photos I've taken at The Nethercutt, nor do I generate commercial value by page-views, clicks, etc. My Nethercutt photos are merely to share my enthusiasm to what is one of America's greatest automotive and Americana museums. If you are from a foreign country, The Nethercutt would be a great place to view American automotive history and priceless Americana objects.)

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(Glenn Thomas Franco Simmons' Photography) 1928 Diana Diana free car downloads free car pics Glenn Franco Simmons Moon Moon Motor Co. Sylmar The Nethercutt Collection https://glennthomasfrancosimmons.com/blog/2019/7/diana-deluxe-a-stylish-1928-car Sun, 21 Jul 2019 04:33:48 GMT